"Rats and roaches live by competition under the law of supply and demand; it is the privilege of human beings to live under the laws of justice and mercy."

Wendell Berry (via azspot)

(via kragtbakker)

"

Shortly, standing before audiences, I discovered something unexpected. The closer my explanation [for the burning of draft files at Catonsville] drew upon biblical instruction and source, the less palatable it became; and this to Catholics. It was as though in so speaking, one was by no means building bridges of understanding. One was putting up a wall, stone by stone, and mortising it tight.

It was quite acceptable to talk “politics.” There was at least a nascent sense that the war was intolerable, granted the American system and its “normal” workings. One gained this small leverage. But the fact that the war might be inconsistent with the words and example of Christ, that killing others was repugnant to the letter and spirit of the Sermon on the Mount — this was too much: it turned living ears to stone.

"

— Daniel Berrigan, To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography (via berrigans)

(via jdaviddark)

jordantarwater:

"The American democratic experiment is unique in human history not because we are God’s chosen people to lead the world, nor because we are always a force for good in the world, but because our refusal to acknowledge the deeply racist and imperial roots of democratic project. We are exceptional…

"At the Pentagon we are dealing with the insane, the spiritually insane. We are dealing with irrational power. So we are not only relying on rational means of communication — the leaflets, the conversations — but the a-rational, the symbolic. The symbols are an effort to make death concrete. The generals never see the other end of their decisions. There is a huge gap between decision and consequence. It is horrifying to see human blood in the immaculate corridors of the Pentagon. Nothing is more dismaying to the people responsible for that enormous Greek temple. Suddenly the truth of the situation is in the air, and under your feet, and it is terrifying."

— Daniel Berrigan, in conversation with the Fellowship of Reconciliation, 1980. Protests by antiwar activists including the Berrigans threw protesters’ blood all over the Pentagon as a means of incarnating the violence, of overcoming the alienation that makes it easy for men in suits and quiet mechanic offices to proclaim death on unseen foreigners. (via berrigans)

nprontheroad:

We found the winter weather that was missing from the Sochi Olympics - it’s in Detroit. Unfortunately, there’s no way this bankrupt city could have shelled out the money it takes to build up Olympic Games infrastructure to welcome the world. Detroit is struggling to pay its bills and take care of its own. 

I’m in Detroit this week with Weekend Edition producer Connor Donevan and our editor Jordana Hochman, just days after the city’s leadership announced its plan to move the city through bankruptcy. It’s a massive undertaking as the city attempts to negotiate its way out of $18 billion dollars in debt - the largest U.S. municipal bankruptcy in history. 

We’re here to try to find out how that plan is going to affect the some remaining 700,000 people who still live here. Over the next few days we’re going to talk with a lot of different people with sometimes competing perspectives, including a couple regional officials, one a former Detroit councilwoman, another from a nearby suburb, who have different ideas about how much the areas surrounding Detroit should pay to help re-build it. We’ll also talk with a group of pensioners trying to figure out how to take care of themselves and their families in a time of real financial instability. And we’ll trace the city’s evolution through a piece of wood. The remains of abandoned homes are being salvaged, refurbished and crafted into furniture purchased by a new generation of Detroit residents intent on making a go of it in this city.

So with that - we’re putting on our down parkas and ski mittens and we’re heading out to find out what’s going on. More to come. 

It would also be really cool if you could report on the pervasive corruption, injustice and illegality of the bankruptcy and the EFM law. You know, if you have time to get around to that while you’re not checking out the ruin porn.

nprontheroad:

We found the winter weather that was missing from the Sochi Olympics - it’s in Detroit. Unfortunately, there’s no way this bankrupt city could have shelled out the money it takes to build up Olympic Games infrastructure to welcome the world. Detroit is struggling to pay its bills and take care of its own. 

I’m in Detroit this week with Weekend Edition producer Connor Donevan and our editor Jordana Hochman, just days after the city’s leadership announced its plan to move the city through bankruptcy. It’s a massive undertaking as the city attempts to negotiate its way out of $18 billion dollars in debt - the largest U.S. municipal bankruptcy in history. 
We’re here to try to find out how that plan is going to affect the some remaining 700,000 people who still live here. Over the next few days we’re going to talk with a lot of different people with sometimes competing perspectives, including a couple regional officials, one a former Detroit councilwoman, another from a nearby suburb, who have different ideas about how much the areas surrounding Detroit should pay to help re-build it. We’ll also talk with a group of pensioners trying to figure out how to take care of themselves and their families in a time of real financial instability. And we’ll trace the city’s evolution through a piece of wood. The remains of abandoned homes are being salvaged, refurbished and crafted into furniture purchased by a new generation of Detroit residents intent on making a go of it in this city.
So with that - we’re putting on our down parkas and ski mittens and we’re heading out to find out what’s going on. More to come. 

It would also be really cool if you could report on the pervasive corruption, injustice and illegality of the bankruptcy and the EFM law. You know, if you have time to get around to that while you’re not checking out the ruin porn.

(via npr)